Walls Stencils, Plaster Stencils, Painting Stencils, Plaster Molds

Huge selection of classic stencils for elegant home decor.

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Wendy Beeker loved the idea of a large tree on her walls, but she wanted a massive trunk and lots of branches!

She created the trunk on her own, using joint compound and paint, which was easy and fun. She made it rough and rugged and awesome.

But creating all those leaves would have been a real chore, so she chose to use just the branch from our Raised Plaster Aspen Tree Stencil Set

Once the branches were in place, she painted every leaf with metallic gold paint. Now that tree shines with glory!

Great job Wendy!

 

 

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Linda Horton knows how to create a fun focal wall!

Using our Raised Plaster Palm Tree Stencil, she plastered a dimensional palm tree to liven up this great accent wall where she displays fun items such as her Las Vegas sign and great memorabilia.

Using colors that coordinate with items on the table brings the look together in a super cute way!

How would you use this palm tree stencil? I would love to use it on the stucco walls of my patio to create the look of a fun, tropical retreat. It would go perfectly with my large pond!

Great job Linda and thank you for sharing!

plaster stenciled fireplace
The wall before

The wall before

Michelle Flair was sick of the boring wall above the fireplace in her home.

When she found our Raised Plaster Stencils, her mind was in frenzy with new ideas.

Seeing our Raised Plaster Stacked Stone Stencil, she knew she’d hit on the perfect solution for her decorating tastes.

Michelle used common joint compound and our easy instructions for pre-tinting the compound to create a stone panel above and around the fireplace.

plaster stenciled fireplace

plaster stenciled fireplace

Her finished design looks absolutely amazing and so REAL! Now, looking at it, could you tell this wasn’t real stone? I couldn’t!

Here’s a helpful hint: When doing a project like this, do yourself a favor and using a level, mark level lines on either side then tape the line with painters tape. That way, your stone design will be level on both sides.

Thank you Michelle! It looks totally fabulous!

plaster-stencil-after

Michelle Flair had an idea for this blank section of wall that sticks out in to her room. She was excited when she found our Raised Plaster Stacked Stone Stencil.  It was the perfect solution for adding a realistic stone look to this odd wall.

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She used the stencil on all three sides of the wall, flipping the stencil over and matching up the stones to repeat the pattern on the adjacent side of the wall.

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Thank you for sharing Michelle!

See the other projects on our site featuring this easy to use stencil.

plaster-stencil-frilly-kathy-frates

Kathy Frates loves beauty, Kathy Frates loves dramatic decorating. But she’s also someone who loves the elegance of “tone on tone” She achieved that with our Raised Plaster Frilly Acanthus Stencil  

At the staircase in her home, there was a blank wall. Not a fitting place for a simple painting, but screaming for something wonderfully ornamental.

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So she plastered the design and then painted over it with rich, chocolate paint.

All I can say is “Wow!”. This wall changed instantly from plain to beautifully elegant!

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Simply painting over a raised stencil design gives you the look of embossed wallpaper. (You know, that highly expensive stuff!). So give it a try. Whether it’s on walls, furniture or ceilings, you’ll be amazed at the results!

 

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wall-before

Ah, the dead, blank wall. Too large for just a few photos in a cutsie lay out. You want something dramatic!

Leading in to the kitchen there is a large arched doorway, so I decided to mimic that same arch on this wall as a background.

painted-arch

I used our Raised Plaster Arched Tree Stencil set to begin arching trees at the curves of the arch.

To repeat the trunks of any of our plaster tree stencils, simply line up the end of the stencil opening with the previous plastered trunk piece then plaster the repeat.

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Once you have plastered the repeat, with your finger or spatula, simply smooth the wet plaster over the dry plaster to blend the two repeats. I pre-tinted the joint compound with dark gray paint (which dries light gray) to save me from having to completely paint the trunks by hand.

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To dry portions of the trunk, start adding side and leafy branches.

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Once the trees were constructed, I dry brushed the gray trunks with white paint to lighten and give them depth.

painting-trunks

I then hand painted the leaves with gold metallic paint. Unfortunately, metallic paint cannot be added to the joint compound. It will never show up and would be a waste of money.

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The finished wall was just beautiful!

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I often use my own walls to showcase my stencil designs. Besides, I like to change things up on a regular basis and that’s FUN!

I had just had a great wood stove put in along the long wall in my living room. That wall just screamed for something…..anything! But what would go best with a wood stove? Aspen trees! And what did I use? Our Raised Plaster Aspen Tree Stencil.

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I began by using both the large and small trunk stencils. Now, we all know you can’t repeat a stencil while the plaster is still wet, so you either wait (impatiently tapping your toes), or you do the “skip” method. Do the first repeat, skip the second, do the third and so on. Once they are all dry, simply fill in the repeats all at the same time!

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On dry portions of the trunk, you can also start adding side branches.

I love taking some of the trunks right up to the ceiling so that they appear to “disappear” right behind the ceiling level.

As you begin to add leafy branches (attached to the side branches), the trees really start to take shape.

Adding paint colors right to the joint compound makes coloring your leaves super easy! No hand painting required!

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I loved this wall right up until I bought new furniture. Now the wall color was too orange. But that was easy to change. Wall paint, a paint brush and a few hours later and the background was gray! Tah Dah!

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Plaster stenciling real looking stone isn’t hard at all.

Sue Thompson loves the look of stone. But who can afford to have an entire interior wall done in stone by a mason? It’s a pricey job!

Sue found our Raised Plaster Stacked Stone Stencil and was elated to find out she could create the look herself with simple joint compound (about $12.00 a bucket!).

She first painted the wall the color she wanted the grout between the stone and then simply repeated the stencil over the walls to give that raised stone pattern. A quick wash of pale brown paint mixed with translucent wall glaze brought out even more detail in the stones by collecting in the natural recesses of the dried joint compound.

The Corner

The corners were easy to accomplish. Simply flip the stencil over backward on the adjacent wall and line up to the previous stenciling then continue.

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Now, can you look at that photo and tell me it isn’t absolutely REAL?