Walls Stencils, Plaster Stencils, Painting Stencils, Plaster Molds

Huge selection of classic stencils for elegant home decor.

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All of the doors in my home are standard 6 panel doors.

Well, you know me, I like something more, something unusual, something exciting!

So I created a series of panel stencils that are perfectly sized for these types of doors.

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I used our Raised Plaster Chaumont Panel Stencil to create the design on each panel.

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See how perfectly it fits in each panel? 

I simply used joint compound then painted the entire door with door and trim paint that matched the color of my walls.

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Now, I LOVE those doors and have done every door in my house, including the entry doors!

See these designs for your doors! (But they also make exquisite border stencil designs!)

Raised Plaster Chaumont Panel

Raised Plaster Leaf Panel

Raised Plaster Bay Leaf Panel

Check out the front door project!

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I found this awesome website giving tutorials on how to emboss aluminum and tin using stencils for the patterns.

http://mercartsmetalembossing.blogspot.com/2014/08/stencils-and-aluminum-on-tin-box.html?m=1

Now how fun is that? Our Raised Plaster Stencils would be the perfect stencil thickness for projects like this because they are thicker than most designer stencils and would hold up well to repeating the pattern.

Wouldn’t this be awesome for a kitchen back splash?

Check it out for yourself!

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I love all things “home decor” and that’s what my blog is all about. Not just stencils or stenciling.

With that in mind, I couldn’t wait to share this incredible make over by my new friend and customer Chris Rees.

First, let me tell you a little about Chris. She’s a visionary who sees things much differently than the rest of us do. Especially when it comes to home decorating. Not only that, she’s incredibly creative! She looks at something and sees a different purpose, a different color, a different slant on what something was meant for.

I have to tell you, she really blew me away with these make overs!

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Step one: Common, iron tea cart.

Step two: Fill with polished rock, add a luscious red sink and accessories, a rustic water fixture and Wha La! The COOLEST bathroom sink cabinet (can you call it a cabinet?)  I’ve ever seen! And how cool she used the tea cart handle as a towel rack! 

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Look how adorable this bathroom came out!

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Now, would WE have ever thought of such a clever use for a tea cart? Me, I would have seen a plant potting cart, maybe a roll around cocktail station, but this gal turned it in to something so wildly elegant!

Now, check THIS one out! See that sink in the photo below? You’re never going to believe this, but it’s a light cover turned upside down! REALLY????? Who would have thought.

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 Here’s what she said about it:

 ” The interesting thing is that this sink bowl is actually something that I came across on our property as we were left with a mix of junk and treasures (ton of it). It is either a reverse lighting lamp or belongs to a ceiling fan light.  I really don’t know, but the measurements were right for the drain so I painted it with Turquoise glass paint, fired it in my oven and well, read about plumbers putty.  Really never unclogged a drain before building two sinks?  My kiddos could not reach the top of the original so whats a Mom to do?”

Clever and creative, she saw a need for a lower sink area for her children and solved the problem in the cutest, most clever way!

On my knees, I bow to your greatness Chris!

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I love my neighbor Chris Saavedra. A beautiful, fabulously charming woman whom I enjoy spending time with.

This year, Chris began re-doing old furniture to sell at craft fairs. So what a perfect time to introduce her to the art of stenciling.

She went NUTS! Just about every piece she produced was embellished with a stencil design that made the piece even more special.

This coffee table project was one of my favorites. She painted the base and legs white, painted the top brown then added one of our stencil designs to the very center. It came out so beautiful that I nearly lugged it home for myself! Isn’t it just sweet?

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She did well at the craft fair with some pieces selling for as high as $150.00

Check out her end table pet bed project! Simply adorable!

I love seeing what other people do with my designs and their ideas for painting finishes on furniture. It gives me new inspiration!

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If you have thought of starting a furniture painting business, or currently struggle with the one you have, do I have news for you!

Julie McDowell of Dandelions and Poppies can help you with ideas and techniques you might not have thought of.

Her creative, elegant make overs are one of a kind beauties that you can learn from, get ideas from and even copy if you like!

Like her Facebook Page to learn more about this spectacular teacher and creative artist!

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Now what a novel idea!

Scan a color, find the paint match

Streamline color selection by instantly matching exact paint colors, and more. The COLOR MUSE device is the latest color scanning technology that allows you to scan smooth or textured surfaces. Equipped with its own light source to ensure precise color scanning, the COLOR MUSE device pairs with the free color muse app on your smart device (iOS & Android) to create an unparalleled color system.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Color-Muse-DIY-paint-match

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Plaster Stencil Bennington Frieze

If you haven’t yet tried Raised Plaster Stencils on small craft projects, you’re missing out!

For durability, use pre-mixed tile grout instead of joint compound as the raised medium. It dries rock hard and stays put through abuse!

This beautiful box started out as a thrift store find for $3.00.

Plaster Stencil Bennington Frieze

After it was primed, I applied our Raised Plaster Bennington Frieze Stencil and then painted over the design and the box with sage green paint. 

I then painted the raised design and trim with gold metallic paint to make it pop.

Adding a cast plaster ornamental piece to the very front (with the same colors) made the entire box just come to life.

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When I moved in to my new home in New Mexico, a 15 foot blank wall stared me in the face for months! Since I use my own home and walls to showcase new products, I decided my new Raised Plaster Arched Tree Stencil Set belonged on this wall, arching over my wood stove.

Yes, it was lovely, but after a few months, I missed my favorite design, my Raised Plaster Aspen Tree Stencil. That’s always been my own signature design and my home in the mountains of Idaho featured 8, eighteen foot tall aspens accenting the walls.

So one afternoon, I scraped the arched trees off the wall and decided I would do my Aspens Trees on a pale gray wall. Gray is a neutral color and is so popular right now that I really thought I’d love it.

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That certainly was the “design” I was after, but the color still wasn’t quite right for all of my furniture and my beige carpet.

I painted over the entire wall with cream colored paint, re-painted the trunks bright white with black bark accents and painted the leaves metallic gold.

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Ah yes. That was it!!!!

The point of this story is that we spend money and put time and effort in to decorating our homes. But if once we do it, it just doesn’t “feel” right, don’t be afraid to make it right! This is YOUR home! You live in it every day! You see those walls day after day and if they don’t appeal to you for “whatever” reason (color, design, lay-out), put in the extra time to get it right. You’ll be so glad that you did!

And don’t think that it’s only “you” who has ever faced this issue. Even designers and interior decorators have encountered the same dilemma. What do we do? We fix it!

 

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Art is Art no matter what medium you use.

Last year, I saw a post on-line about how to make concrete leaves and just had to try it. I made many and loved every one. Most of them, I gave to my Mother who fell in love with them and now has a yard covered in them thanks to my great pumpkin plants that provided the leaf.

I’ve learned a lot since that original first project and have learned ways to actually create curves in the leaves.

This year, I pampered my rhubarb plant with lots of care and fertilizer so that it would provide me with extra large leaves for my new passion. It hasn’t disappointed!

Start by creating a mound of dirt in your yard. The higher this mound is, the more curved your leaf will be around the sides.

If you dig a small “ditch” around the outside of this mound, you can bend the leaves right in to ditch to make your final concrete leaf “curl” on the edges.

Firstly, choose a leaf that has no tears and has great veining.

Place a garbage bag over the mound of dirt and place your leaf face down over the bag. (Vein side up).

I like to use “Cement All” Rapid Set concrete which is a casting concrete that comes in boxes from Home Depot or Lowe’s. This product has no rocks in it like Quickrete does and it’s boxes are convenient and easy to carry.

Mix Concrete

Put some of the concrete in a bucket and add water a little at a time. Stir with a garden shovel to the consistency of pudding.

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Completely cover the leaf with a thick layer of concrete. I cover mine at least an inch thick.

Allow the concrete to set up completely. If it’s warm to the touch, the process is not yet complete.

Lift Leaf

Once cool, lift the leaf from the mound.

Remove-leaf

The original instructions say to let the leaf dry then use a wire brush to remove the dry leaf from the concrete. I found it MUCH easier to remove the moist leaf right away!

For deep veins, it’s sometimes necessary to use a small, flat head screw driver to pry the vein material out of the crevices.

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Leaves can then be painted or left the natural concrete color.

Use these concrete leaves as pond ornaments (as I have done), candy dishes, bird baths, bird feeders, downspout water diverters or even bathroom soap holders (depending on the size of the leaf).

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These are not only a blast to make, they also make fabulous gifts! Just ask my Mother who has 12 of them now!

 

If you haven’t heard of it yet, I urge you to visit HomeTalk.com

This website is a collaboration of people just like you and I, who come up with fabulous DIY  ideas and just how to achieve them, often with step by step photo instructions.

I’m completely addicted since there are so many ideas on re-purposing everything from tin cans in to adorable yard lights to DIY yard furniture using cinder blocks and boards.

Looking for ideas for your walls? Simply search for “Walls” and be prepared to be delightfully overwhelmed with the wonderfully creative choices.

You also have the ability to pose your own dilemmas to other DIY folks, who are delighted to help you out.

Do you have your own creative projects that you’re proud of? Set up an account and post them for the world to see. You might even get featured! 

Many of my projects have been featured, one being shared over 70 thousand times.

This is one of the most useful and unique websites on the internet today and one you might consider visiting regularly.

 

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