Walls Stencils, Plaster Stencils, Painting Stencils, Plaster Molds

Huge selection of classic stencils for elegant home decor.

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Margaret Tarkington knew exactly what she wanted to do on the exterior of her home and it had to be cheery and colorful! And what she did feels like it right out of a Bavarian village!
Using our Raised Plaster Art Deco Flower Border Stencil with just paint, she first painted the exterior trim with dark green paint then added the stencil design in lighter green for the body of the border and then brilliant red and yellow for the flowers.

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All the windows and doorways were done in the same manner.
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What I loved about this set of windows is that she decided to paint the frames between the panes of glass with the same lighter green she used in the border design. Set against that dark green background really made this set of windows come to life.

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Keeping the stencil design above the doorway only allowed her the creative use of paint she’s done to create this welcoming entry. Picking up the lighter green again, and buttery yellow of the flower centers, she brightened up the doors to create a real focal point.
I honestly just wanted to get on bended knee and applaud her for this wonderful make over of the exterior of her home. It’s unusual, creative and so cheerful! Thank you for letting me share Margaret! You did a spectacular job!
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I found a cute little folding table for my patio at the thrift store. Just $4.00!

I took it home, cleaned it up and spray painted the top black.

I then added a spray pattern of gray/ blue.

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Then patterns of metallic gold

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After it was all dry, I taped the stencil in place at the edge of the table, allowing only part of the pattern to be visible on the edge of the table.

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A 1/2″ stencil brush and black acrylic paint were used to add the stencil design to the table. For this project, I used our Raised Plaster Leaf Panel Stencil.

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Remove the stencil, by gently peeling it back, to reveal the pretty new stencil design.

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The black design against the muted colors of the top of the table making for a striking new look!

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Give it a coat of exterior sealer for outdoor use.

It’s never ceased to amaze me how you can take a thrift store find and turn it in to something really awesome with just paint and a stencil design!

Now, it’s a part of my yard decor and is something I use regularly and just love!

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Brenda Foster loves design and like me, sees a blank wall as a new canvas!

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Using our Raised Plaster Wisteria Stencil with pastel paints instead of plasters, she stenciled the whole back side of her shed with wisteria vines, dripping with lovely lavender blossoms. What a wonderful “garden” theme!

I love how she allowed the stenciled vines to trail and cover the surface as if they were actually growing from a live plant, seemingly coming right out of the soil!

This certainly makes me look at my garage door differently all of a sudden!

Great job Brenda! I love what you do!

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Our front entries are always the first thing one sees from the street that stand out (or should).

Make your entry door something special with raised plaster stencils!

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Here, I used our Raised Plaster Chaumont Panel Stencil to add detail and drama to the panels on the front door. 

Giving the raised design a light brushing of metallic gold paint made that door something truly elegant!

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Now the front door also matches the interior doors since I did the same design on those as well.

See the project here.

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When I moved to New Mexico, there was an acre of vacant land next to me. But when it was sold and a family built their home just 10 feet from my fence, my privacy was a thing of the past.

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I put up a lattice wall thinking it would solve the problem of neighbors staring in to my once private back yard, but it wasn’t enough to cut off their view.

I purchased 12″ x 8′ boards from Home Depot and stained them with exterior stain to protect them from the elements.

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I wanted a “natural” design so I chose the leafy branch portion of our Raised Plaster Aspen Tree Stencil. It was perfect to create pretty branches on my new wall.

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I first used metallic silver paint to randomly stencil branches.

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I then added more branches, (some overlapping the silver branches) with gold metallic paint.

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Once they were attached to the fence not only did they afford more privacy, but created an out door art wall that I could add ornamental items to.

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Art is Art no matter what medium you use.

Last year, I saw a post on-line about how to make concrete leaves and just had to try it. I made many and loved every one. Most of them, I gave to my Mother who fell in love with them and now has a yard covered in them thanks to my great pumpkin plants that provided the leaf.

I’ve learned a lot since that original first project and have learned ways to actually create curves in the leaves.

This year, I pampered my rhubarb plant with lots of care and fertilizer so that it would provide me with extra large leaves for my new passion. It hasn’t disappointed!

Start by creating a mound of dirt in your yard. The higher this mound is, the more curved your leaf will be around the sides.

If you dig a small “ditch” around the outside of this mound, you can bend the leaves right in to ditch to make your final concrete leaf “curl” on the edges.

Firstly, choose a leaf that has no tears and has great veining.

Place a garbage bag over the mound of dirt and place your leaf face down over the bag. (Vein side up).

I like to use “Cement All” Rapid Set concrete which is a casting concrete that comes in boxes from Home Depot or Lowe’s. This product has no rocks in it like Quickrete does and it’s boxes are convenient and easy to carry.

Mix Concrete

Put some of the concrete in a bucket and add water a little at a time. Stir with a garden shovel to the consistency of pudding.

apply to leaf

Completely cover the leaf with a thick layer of concrete. I cover mine at least an inch thick.

Allow the concrete to set up completely. If it’s warm to the touch, the process is not yet complete.

Lift Leaf

Once cool, lift the leaf from the mound.

Remove-leaf

The original instructions say to let the leaf dry then use a wire brush to remove the dry leaf from the concrete. I found it MUCH easier to remove the moist leaf right away!

For deep veins, it’s sometimes necessary to use a small, flat head screw driver to pry the vein material out of the crevices.

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Leaves can then be painted or left the natural concrete color.

Use these concrete leaves as pond ornaments (as I have done), candy dishes, bird baths, bird feeders, downspout water diverters or even bathroom soap holders (depending on the size of the leaf).

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These are not only a blast to make, they also make fabulous gifts! Just ask my Mother who has 12 of them now!

 

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It started as a large, plain terra cotta pot from Walmart. 

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I put it on the lazy susan in my craft shop and got to work.

I used our Raised Plaster Cerise Vine Stencil and instead of joint compound as the medium, I used pre-mixed tile grout. It dries rock hard and you don’t have to worry about wind or rain disturbing the design.

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Don’t worry if the grout crumbles a little. That’s natural. But don’t over-work the grout.

Peel the stencil back to reveal the new design.

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When using tile grout, be sure to clean your stencil immediately after each use so it doesn’t dry and clog the stencil openings.

After the stenciling is done, let it dry overnight.

Once dry, I sprayed the entire pot with Rustoleum’s Hammered Copper spray paint.

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To create the Patina look, I used a damp sea sponge and after randomly brushing areas of the pot with Americana’s Sea Aqua craft paint (watered down just a hint), I sponged it to blend.

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I then hand painted the vine with Art Deco’s metallic aqua paint to make them pop.

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It’s now a permanent decorator fixture in my back yard!

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This would be a great “for sale” item at craft fairs or on Etsy. Give it a try for yourself. It was fun!

 

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Plaster stenciled cattails? Really? Sheila Madsen thought it was an amazing idea!

She used our Raised Plaster Freestyle Cattails Stencil to create dimensional cattails on her walls.

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The cool thing about this stencil set is that the spiked leaves and cattails are separated so that you can repeat them any way you choose, and make them any height you wish!

Awesome on walls, but think about doing your block wall or wood fence with this stencil design. How cool would that be???

 

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Plaster stencils aren’t just for interiors, and I’m often asked “can you use them outside?”. Sure! There’s no reason why not. The surprising thing is that you can even use plaster stencils with common joint compound outside! Simply make sure you seal the design with exterior paint.

When I wanted to sell my home in the high mountains of Northern Idaho, I knew I absolutely had to do something with those ugly exterior doors!

They’d become weathered and lost all their finish years before. They weren’t in great shape when we bought the home and after using it as a vacation home for 9 years, they were even worse!

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The harsh weather had created deep cracks in the wood. So since I’m the queen of plaster, I simply filled those cracks with joint compound to create a smooth surface again then sanded the doors. Sure, I could have used wood putty, but I knew they were going to get high quality exterior paint that would finally protect them. 

I plastered the design using joint compound on to the base of each door, painted the entire door with a custom green/blue (to match the beautiful forest!) and then painted just the design with metallic pewter paint to give it a bit of “glam”. What a huge difference!

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I love how the design came out.

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Shed-Makeover

We’ve always been all about decorating the inside of our homes. But what about the outside?

There are many ways to use stencils and your own creative artwork to add your personality to outdoor spaces.

I love decorating with raised plaster stencils. They create a raised design on anything you put them on! Whether you want to add an elegant design to planter boxes,

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Or make over an old garden tool shed,

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Plaster stencils give you dimensional beauty!

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On this shed door, I combined plaster branches from our  Raised Plaster Pine Tree Stencil Set with pine cones from the included plaster molds to give it a woodsy look.

Just about any surface can be embellished with your own art or stenciling.

Here, Lynn Low used her own hand painted art to create an interesting mural on her block wall surrounding her pool.

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Simple acrylic paint was used to create the tree, vines, bushes and urn full of plants. Where you don’t have artistic skills, that’s where stencils come in!

So before “living outdoors” once again takes place,  take a look around your exterior to see what you can make prettier with a bit of art.

Exterior surfaces that can be stenciled:

Deck rails

Concrete walkways and patio floors

Planter boxes

Block walls

Wooden fences

Garden pots

Porch posts and floors